Services

therapys

Psychological Therapy

Psychological therapy (or psychotherapy) is a treatment for people who experience mental health issues, to help them feel better, improve their day-to-day functioning, and reduce their symptoms. Psychotherapy is often described as “talking therapy”: It involves communicating with a mental health professional (such as a psychologist), talking freely about issues that might have been too big or challenging to ever have discussed before.

But psychotherapy is more than just talking:

Psychologists are specifically trained and skilled in the way they help their clients, by asking specific questions that invite self-reflection, and by applying evidence-based techniques to help them shift unhelpful habits and beliefs. In psychotherapy, clients learn about their specific patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviour that might contribute to or maintain their distress, and then find more helpful ways to move forward and live easier.

Psychotherapy is a collaborative approach with the client at the centre, and the psychotherapist as the non- judgemental and objective professional who is there to work with you.

Psychological therapy can help with longstanding problems, ranging from anxiety and depression, to obsessive – compulsive disorder (OCD), eating disorders, or personality disorders that might impact your physical health, your work capacity, and relationships.

Psychotherapy can also help when people are going through particularly stressful times, such as after a traumatic event, or when facing serious life problems, such as separation, divorce, serious illness, a loved one’s death, or other stressful events.

Psychotherapy can also help in more general ways, such as supporting clients to become more confident, improving communication and relationship skills, managing conflict or work-related issues, or helping them find out what they really want from life.

There are a range of different types of psychological therapy, including (but not limited to):

  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT)
  • Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT)
  • Emotion Focused Therapy (EFT)
  • Psychodynamic Psychotherapy
  • Schema Therapy

Our psychologists at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology can guide you in finding a suitable approach for you.

How do I know if psychotherapy is helpful for me?

There are a number of signs to look out for, to determine if you could benefit from psychotherapy, including (but not limited to):

  • If you have been feeling down, depressed, or sad for a while, and things you used to enjoy no longer interest you
  • If you’ve been on edge, anxious, struggling to sleep, and worrying a lot
  • If you are facing difficult life challenges, or if there have been sudden and unexpected changes in your life, that you struggle to adjust to or come to terms with
  • If you have tried for a while but somehow you feel “stuck” and things are not getting better.
  • If you have noticed changes in your thoughts that are troubling you (e.g., constantly worrying; thinking of the worst thing that could happen)
  • If your behaviour has changed, and you might find yourself get easily frustrated; or you might drink more alcohol; or eat more or less than usual, and have trouble sleeping

Sometimes people come and see a psychologist because their GP, or their friends or families recommended it. This can be because often, when we are in the midst of anxiety, depression or stress, we can’t really see the issue because we’ve been living with it for so long.

Whatever it is that brings you to seeking psychotherapy, at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology it is our aim to support you, work towards your goals and help you feel better!

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

everydaylifes

Psychoeducational Assessment

A psychoeducational assessment provides an objective measure of a student’s learning profile. There are multiple reasons for a student to undergo such testing. The most common request for an assessment is to consider unexplained or unresponsive academic difficulties. Psychoeducational testing can identify learning disorders (such as Dyslexia), intellectual disabilities, and provide a conceptualization of a student’s academic strengths and weaknesses. In most cases we are aiming to answer the question: “How does this student learn best”?

It is also common for student’s to undergo psychoeducational assessment to identify advanced (e.g. Gifted) development, provide baseline data on a learning profile, or to gain entry into a particular academic program or support option that requires such an assessment to have been completed.

Perhaps the most important outcome of a psychoeducational assessment is the potential to make informed decisions about the student’s learning needs. On the basis of a comprehensive psychoeducational profile we are able to tailor recommendations, including support and intervention that account for the student’s individual learning potentials.

Standard psychoeducational testing includes a measure of intellectual potential, and academic achievement (reading, writing, and mathematics), and is completed over duration of one day. Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology have expanded this protocol to include a clinical inventory (a self-report measure of self-esteem and other emotions). This inventory has been included as we recognise that emotional presentation can significantly impact a student’s academic achievement (and vice- versa). We therefore believe it informs an important part of a learning profile.

Vocational Assessment

A vocational assessment provides insight into a person’s character and interests with a view toward determining a range of potentially suitable career options. In addition, vocational testing can be of use to those in leadership positions, who are wanting to gain a better understanding of their employees, or to assist with the process of retention and recruitment. Vocational testing is most often used to facilitate career exploration, career transition, or to assist with determining the probable fit of an individual to a working environment. Senior school and University students might request vocational testing to assist with determining potential career options, and therefore contributing to their choice of class or course selection. An individual with a well-established career, but who has a sense they would like a change, could engage vocational testing in order to better explore and consider their potential transition. Vocational testing might also be useful for those looking to re-enter the workforce, after an absence, or those who are quite certain that they are in an area that is causing unnecessary stress or discontent.

In an ideal situation, our working lives will be satisfying, engaging, and represent a meaningful pursuit. Vocational assessment can work toward with this end by providing evidence-based insights into an individual’s character and interests, and thereby helping their search for a rich and fulfilling career.

Personality Assessment

Personality assessments are useful for those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of themselves and how they interact with others and the world around them. Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology provide personality assessments using the Myer Briggs Type Indicator (the most widely used assessment in the world). The applications are many and varied, including the fulfilment of personal insight and curiosity, a compliment to ongoing psychological therapy, assisting teamwork, recruitment, and workplace performance.

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Untitled

Autism Spectrum Disorder Assessments

What is Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a pervasive developmental disorder that effects how an individual develops, learns, and interacts with the world around them. It is characterised by social communication difficulties, as well as repetitive patterns of behaviours, restricted interests and activates and/or difficulties in processing sensory input.

ASD is a lifelong disorder that is present at or soon after birth and the symptoms and behaviours associated with ASD are evident in early development although the functional impact of these may not become apparent at this stage. The characteristics of ASD can vary significantly between individuals and the way ASD presents in one individual may be different to how it presents in another. Furthermore, the behaviours associated with ASD can vary within individuals as they grow and develop and respond to various situations and environments in their daily lives.

What are the signs?

Communication & Social Difficulties

For young children early signs for Autism Spectrum Disorder is difficulties with communication.  This can involve delayed speech but not always.  A child may not seek you out to engage in play or simple interactions or want to share with you, they do not point or show you things, or respond when their name is called.  Older children, with developed speech, may continue to have difficulties communicating, showing poor conversational skills and showing a lack of awareness of others.  They may have difficulty interacting with their peers, possibly preferring the company of adults.  Forming and maintaining friendships with their peers can also be challenging.

Limited or Unusual Behaviours

Autism is not just a social disorder, another key indicator for Autism Spectrum Disorder is that a child is also demonstrating unusual or restricted behaviours.  Children may engage in behaviours such as repetitively playing with objects, such as lining up objects or categorising, and not engaging in pretend or imaginative play.  They may show repetitive and unusual body movements, such as slapping their hands or walking on their toes, or their speech may be unusual, repeating words or phrases or making unusual vocalisations.  Other behaviour may include, having difficulty with change or insisting on “sameness” or they may become fixated on specific topics or interests.  Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder often display unusual sensory reactions, they may be sensitive to sensory stimuli, such as experiencing negative responses to sound or tactile sensations, or they may also seek out sensory stimuli, such as rubbing, licking or smelling objects, or peering or staring and lights and patterns.

How is Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosed?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is defined by a complex pattern of unique behaviours and interactions that can vary in their manifestation, but are representative of the particular diagnostic criteria.

The criteria for ASD from the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – Fifth Edition (DSM-5) specifies that people diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder must present with specific and persistent deficits in two main areas including

  • Social communication and social interaction, and
  • Restricted, repetitive patterns of interests, activities, or behaviours.

Diagnosis requires that significant deficits in the areas mentioned above exist for each individual; however, people present differently and are affected in each area to varying degrees.  No single behaviour is indicative of Autism Spectrum Disorder, and no single behaviour rules out the diagnosis; the significant factor is the pattern of behaviours from the relevant areas.

There is no single test ASD; however, there is a combination of testing methods and processes that can give an accurate ASD diagnosis that will also identify an individual’s strengths and weaknesses, in relation to their social, emotional, and behavioural development. Perhaps the most important outcome of a diagnostic assessment is the potential to make informed decisions about your or your child’s social and emotional needs and development.

Why is having a diagnosis important?

Receiving a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder allows you or your child to access specific state and national government support, funding and services. It ensures that an individual accesses appropriate support and intervention which is targeted to their needs/abilities. During the assessment process a profile of strengths and areas of challenge is determined which can be utilised by those working with the individual to better understand their needs and ways to promote learning and development. Receiving a diagnosis can also help individuals better understand themselves and why they may feel, think or act differently to others.

What Autism Spectrum Disorder assessments do Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology offer?

A dual diagnosis is required by Autism SA to access all of their services. Additionally, there is a movement towards a dual diagnosis to receive government funding and services. The benefit of an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) assessment at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology is that Registered Psychologist Dr Annabel Marsh, and Speech Pathologist Ms Caitlin Del Zoppo, are both very experienced diagnosticians who are both approved assessors by Autism SA. Our diagnosticians have experience in both paediatric and adult assessments. As such we can offer:

  • Dual ASD assessments with a Psychologist and Speech Pathologist
  • Single initial assessments with a Psychologist or Speech Pathologist
  • Single confirmation assessments with a Psychologist or Speech Pathologist following an initial diagnostic assessment
  • Review assessments

Our administration team will discuss these assessments with you and determine which assessment is most appropriate for you or your child.

How are Autism Spectrum Disorder assessments conducted at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is based on a number of assessment processes. Firstly, an observation of your child during a play based assessment is conducted. This may include using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2). Secondly, a comprehensive interview of the parent / guardian is conducted. This may include using the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R). Finally, a review of your child’s developmental history is completed. In addition to formal assessments, we collect information via questionnaire and interview. The information requested includes relevant history, current concerns, and general observations regarding classroom behaviour.

Please note that the clinicians may decide to alter this procedure to include or exclude assessments based on what is most appropriate to the question being answered, or the problem being investigated. It may also be necessary to do an observation or visit at your child’s child care centre, kindergarten, or school following the initial assessment procedure. This decision will be discussed with you in detail if necessary.

Our experienced clinicians will provide you with the quality care and professional service we are known for.

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

assessments

Psychology for Everyday Life

Talking through your problems or wonderings with a trained professional can lead to greater insight and the identification of potential areas for change.

Psychotherapy is not only for those with a clinical disorder or other more serious disturbance. While an effective treatment for mental health concerns, psychotherapy is also useful when applied to our everyday problems and curiosities. At Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology we believe the only qualification you need to enter therapy is to be entirely normal.

The experiences of everyday life are many and varied. It might be that you are experiencing interpersonal or family troubles, considering a change of career, or wondering why you appear to find yourself in the same situations over and over again. It could also be that you want to improve your relationships, are grieving, anxious, stressed, or simply curious or concerned about certain parts of your personality. Whatever it is that you are going through we are here to listen.

Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology have highly qualified clinicians that are willing and able to assist you on your journey through life. Talking through your problems or wonderings with a trained professional can lead to greater insight and the identification of potential areas for change. The ultimate aim of psychotherapy is to encourage self-knowledge and understanding, in an environment that is confidential, non-judgemental, and essentially, kind and supportive.

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Supervision

The Directors of Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology are board approved supervisors (AHPRA). This service will be of interest to Registered Psychologists wanting to gain endorsement via the Clinical Psychology Registrar Program, or those who are simply seeking peer supervision, as part of their continuing Professional Development

For further information please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Telehealth

Our clinicians can provide Therapy services remotely, via teleconferencing platforms such as Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, Coviu and our integrated practice management platform “Cliniko”.

Telehealth therapy and assessment services can ensure that clients can access psychological supports where and when they need it – from the comfort of their own homes.

Medicare and private health rebates are available (please speak to our reception team to discuss your options).

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Therapy
therapys

Psychological Therapy

Psychological therapy (or psychotherapy) is a treatment for people who experience mental health issues, to help them feel better, improve their day-to-day functioning, and reduce their symptoms. Psychotherapy is often described as “talking therapy”: It involves communicating with a mental health professional (such as a psychologist), talking freely about issues that might have been too big or challenging to ever have discussed before.

But psychotherapy is more than just talking:

Psychologists are specifically trained and skilled in the way they help their clients, by asking specific questions that invite self-reflection, and by applying evidence-based techniques to help them shift unhelpful habits and beliefs. In psychotherapy, clients learn about their specific patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviour that might contribute to or maintain their distress, and then find more helpful ways to move forward and live easier.

Psychotherapy is a collaborative approach with the client at the centre, and the psychotherapist as the non- judgemental and objective professional who is there to work with you.

Psychological therapy can help with longstanding problems, ranging from anxiety and depression, to obsessive – compulsive disorder (OCD), eating disorders, or personality disorders that might impact your physical health, your work capacity, and relationships.

Psychotherapy can also help when people are going through particularly stressful times, such as after a traumatic event, or when facing serious life problems, such as separation, divorce, serious illness, a loved one’s death, or other stressful events.

Psychotherapy can also help in more general ways, such as supporting clients to become more confident, improving communication and relationship skills, managing conflict or work-related issues, or helping them find out what they really want from life.

There are a range of different types of psychological therapy, including (but not limited to):

  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT)
  • Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT)
  • Emotion Focused Therapy (EFT)
  • Psychodynamic Psychotherapy
  • Schema Therapy

Our psychologists at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology can guide you in finding a suitable approach for you.

How do I know if psychotherapy is helpful for me?

There are a number of signs to look out for, to determine if you could benefit from psychotherapy, including (but not limited to):

  • If you have been feeling down, depressed, or sad for a while, and things you used to enjoy no longer interest you
  • If you’ve been on edge, anxious, struggling to sleep, and worrying a lot
  • If you are facing difficult life challenges, or if there have been sudden and unexpected changes in your life, that you struggle to adjust to or come to terms with
  • If you have tried for a while but somehow you feel “stuck” and things are not getting better.
  • If you have noticed changes in your thoughts that are troubling you (e.g., constantly worrying; thinking of the worst thing that could happen)
  • If your behaviour has changed, and you might find yourself get easily frustrated; or you might drink more alcohol; or eat more or less than usual, and have trouble sleeping

Sometimes people come and see a psychologist because their GP, or their friends or families recommended it. This can be because often, when we are in the midst of anxiety, depression or stress, we can’t really see the issue because we’ve been living with it for so long.

Whatever it is that brings you to seeking psychotherapy, at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology it is our aim to support you, work towards your goals and help you feel better!

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Assessment
everydaylifes

Psychoeducational Assessment

A psychoeducational assessment provides an objective measure of a student’s learning profile. There are multiple reasons for a student to undergo such testing. The most common request for an assessment is to consider unexplained or unresponsive academic difficulties. Psychoeducational testing can identify learning disorders (such as Dyslexia), intellectual disabilities, and provide a conceptualization of a student’s academic strengths and weaknesses. In most cases we are aiming to answer the question: “How does this student learn best”?

It is also common for student’s to undergo psychoeducational assessment to identify advanced (e.g. Gifted) development, provide baseline data on a learning profile, or to gain entry into a particular academic program or support option that requires such an assessment to have been completed.

Perhaps the most important outcome of a psychoeducational assessment is the potential to make informed decisions about the student’s learning needs. On the basis of a comprehensive psychoeducational profile we are able to tailor recommendations, including support and intervention that account for the student’s individual learning potentials.

Standard psychoeducational testing includes a measure of intellectual potential, and academic achievement (reading, writing, and mathematics), and is completed over duration of one day. Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology have expanded this protocol to include a clinical inventory (a self-report measure of self-esteem and other emotions). This inventory has been included as we recognise that emotional presentation can significantly impact a student’s academic achievement (and vice- versa). We therefore believe it informs an important part of a learning profile.

Vocational Assessment

A vocational assessment provides insight into a person’s character and interests with a view toward determining a range of potentially suitable career options. In addition, vocational testing can be of use to those in leadership positions, who are wanting to gain a better understanding of their employees, or to assist with the process of retention and recruitment. Vocational testing is most often used to facilitate career exploration, career transition, or to assist with determining the probable fit of an individual to a working environment. Senior school and University students might request vocational testing to assist with determining potential career options, and therefore contributing to their choice of class or course selection. An individual with a well-established career, but who has a sense they would like a change, could engage vocational testing in order to better explore and consider their potential transition. Vocational testing might also be useful for those looking to re-enter the workforce, after an absence, or those who are quite certain that they are in an area that is causing unnecessary stress or discontent.

In an ideal situation, our working lives will be satisfying, engaging, and represent a meaningful pursuit. Vocational assessment can work toward with this end by providing evidence-based insights into an individual’s character and interests, and thereby helping their search for a rich and fulfilling career.

Personality Assessment

Personality assessments are useful for those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of themselves and how they interact with others and the world around them. Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology provide personality assessments using the Myer Briggs Type Indicator (the most widely used assessment in the world). The applications are many and varied, including the fulfilment of personal insight and curiosity, a compliment to ongoing psychological therapy, assisting teamwork, recruitment, and workplace performance.

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Autism Spectrum Disorder Assessments
Untitled

Autism Spectrum Disorder Assessments

What is Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a pervasive developmental disorder that effects how an individual develops, learns, and interacts with the world around them. It is characterised by social communication difficulties, as well as repetitive patterns of behaviours, restricted interests and activates and/or difficulties in processing sensory input.

ASD is a lifelong disorder that is present at or soon after birth and the symptoms and behaviours associated with ASD are evident in early development although the functional impact of these may not become apparent at this stage. The characteristics of ASD can vary significantly between individuals and the way ASD presents in one individual may be different to how it presents in another. Furthermore, the behaviours associated with ASD can vary within individuals as they grow and develop and respond to various situations and environments in their daily lives.

What are the signs?

Communication & Social Difficulties

For young children early signs for Autism Spectrum Disorder is difficulties with communication.  This can involve delayed speech but not always.  A child may not seek you out to engage in play or simple interactions or want to share with you, they do not point or show you things, or respond when their name is called.  Older children, with developed speech, may continue to have difficulties communicating, showing poor conversational skills and showing a lack of awareness of others.  They may have difficulty interacting with their peers, possibly preferring the company of adults.  Forming and maintaining friendships with their peers can also be challenging.

Limited or Unusual Behaviours

Autism is not just a social disorder, another key indicator for Autism Spectrum Disorder is that a child is also demonstrating unusual or restricted behaviours.  Children may engage in behaviours such as repetitively playing with objects, such as lining up objects or categorising, and not engaging in pretend or imaginative play.  They may show repetitive and unusual body movements, such as slapping their hands or walking on their toes, or their speech may be unusual, repeating words or phrases or making unusual vocalisations.  Other behaviour may include, having difficulty with change or insisting on “sameness” or they may become fixated on specific topics or interests.  Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder often display unusual sensory reactions, they may be sensitive to sensory stimuli, such as experiencing negative responses to sound or tactile sensations, or they may also seek out sensory stimuli, such as rubbing, licking or smelling objects, or peering or staring and lights and patterns.

How is Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosed?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is defined by a complex pattern of unique behaviours and interactions that can vary in their manifestation, but are representative of the particular diagnostic criteria.

The criteria for ASD from the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – Fifth Edition (DSM-5) specifies that people diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder must present with specific and persistent deficits in two main areas including

  • Social communication and social interaction, and
  • Restricted, repetitive patterns of interests, activities, or behaviours.

Diagnosis requires that significant deficits in the areas mentioned above exist for each individual; however, people present differently and are affected in each area to varying degrees.  No single behaviour is indicative of Autism Spectrum Disorder, and no single behaviour rules out the diagnosis; the significant factor is the pattern of behaviours from the relevant areas.

There is no single test ASD; however, there is a combination of testing methods and processes that can give an accurate ASD diagnosis that will also identify an individual’s strengths and weaknesses, in relation to their social, emotional, and behavioural development. Perhaps the most important outcome of a diagnostic assessment is the potential to make informed decisions about your or your child’s social and emotional needs and development.

Why is having a diagnosis important?

Receiving a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder allows you or your child to access specific state and national government support, funding and services. It ensures that an individual accesses appropriate support and intervention which is targeted to their needs/abilities. During the assessment process a profile of strengths and areas of challenge is determined which can be utilised by those working with the individual to better understand their needs and ways to promote learning and development. Receiving a diagnosis can also help individuals better understand themselves and why they may feel, think or act differently to others.

What Autism Spectrum Disorder assessments do Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology offer?

A dual diagnosis is required by Autism SA to access all of their services. Additionally, there is a movement towards a dual diagnosis to receive government funding and services. The benefit of an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) assessment at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology is that Registered Psychologist Dr Annabel Marsh, and Speech Pathologist Ms Caitlin Del Zoppo, are both very experienced diagnosticians who are both approved assessors by Autism SA. Our diagnosticians have experience in both paediatric and adult assessments. As such we can offer:

  • Dual ASD assessments with a Psychologist and Speech Pathologist
  • Single initial assessments with a Psychologist or Speech Pathologist
  • Single confirmation assessments with a Psychologist or Speech Pathologist following an initial diagnostic assessment
  • Review assessments

Our administration team will discuss these assessments with you and determine which assessment is most appropriate for you or your child.

How are Autism Spectrum Disorder assessments conducted at Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is based on a number of assessment processes. Firstly, an observation of your child during a play based assessment is conducted. This may include using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2). Secondly, a comprehensive interview of the parent / guardian is conducted. This may include using the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R). Finally, a review of your child’s developmental history is completed. In addition to formal assessments, we collect information via questionnaire and interview. The information requested includes relevant history, current concerns, and general observations regarding classroom behaviour.

Please note that the clinicians may decide to alter this procedure to include or exclude assessments based on what is most appropriate to the question being answered, or the problem being investigated. It may also be necessary to do an observation or visit at your child’s child care centre, kindergarten, or school following the initial assessment procedure. This decision will be discussed with you in detail if necessary.

Our experienced clinicians will provide you with the quality care and professional service we are known for.

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Everyday Life
assessments

Psychology for Everyday Life

Talking through your problems or wonderings with a trained professional can lead to greater insight and the identification of potential areas for change.

Psychotherapy is not only for those with a clinical disorder or other more serious disturbance. While an effective treatment for mental health concerns, psychotherapy is also useful when applied to our everyday problems and curiosities. At Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology we believe the only qualification you need to enter therapy is to be entirely normal.

The experiences of everyday life are many and varied. It might be that you are experiencing interpersonal or family troubles, considering a change of career, or wondering why you appear to find yourself in the same situations over and over again. It could also be that you want to improve your relationships, are grieving, anxious, stressed, or simply curious or concerned about certain parts of your personality. Whatever it is that you are going through we are here to listen.

Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology have highly qualified clinicians that are willing and able to assist you on your journey through life. Talking through your problems or wonderings with a trained professional can lead to greater insight and the identification of potential areas for change. The ultimate aim of psychotherapy is to encourage self-knowledge and understanding, in an environment that is confidential, non-judgemental, and essentially, kind and supportive.

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Supervision

Supervision

The Directors of Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology are board approved supervisors (AHPRA). This service will be of interest to Registered Psychologists wanting to gain endorsement via the Clinical Psychology Registrar Program, or those who are simply seeking peer supervision, as part of their continuing Professional Development

For further information please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Telehealth

Telehealth

Our clinicians can provide Therapy services remotely, via teleconferencing platforms such as Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, Coviu and our integrated practice management platform “Cliniko”.

Telehealth therapy and assessment services can ensure that clients can access psychological supports where and when they need it – from the comfort of their own homes.

Medicare and private health rebates are available (please speak to our reception team to discuss your options).

For further information or to book an appointment, please contact Neaves & Menne Clinical Psychology

Something troubling you? Get in touch with us and make an appointment today